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Our concerts for 2020

This page shows our concert series for 2020. Details of performers, the musical offerings and program notes can be accessed (as they become available) by clicking on the concert series title.

Of course program changes beyond our control may occur from time to time. Please join our mail or email list to have the current program details sent to you or view this page regularly.

Tickets:

$30, concession $25 and students $15.

Available at the door, or online via EventBookings until 1 day prior (while a button is displayed).

February

Cello & Piano Encore!

Fri 21 Feb, 11:00am
Home Hill Winery*
Ranelagh


Book now

Sat 22 Feb, 2:00pm
Holy Trinity Church
Launceston


Book now

Sun 23 Feb, 2:00pm
LifeWay Baptist Church
Devonport


Book now

Mon 24 Feb, 11:00am
Riversdale Estate*
Cambridge


Book now

March

Oboe & Harp

TBC
St Andrews Anglican Church
Evandale

TBC
Home Hill Winery*
Ranelagh


TBC
MONA Organ Room
Berriedale

April/May

Dvorak & Mozart

Fri 24 Apr, 2:00pm
Burnie Arts & Function Centre
Burnie

TBC
Holy Trinity Church
Launceston


TBC
Home Hill Winery*
Ranelagh


TBC
MONA Organ Room
Berriedale

Sun 10 May, 3:00pm
Holy Trinity Church**
Cressy

June

Meriel Owen et al

TBC
Home Hill Winery*
Ranelagh


TBC
Riversdale Estate*
Cambridge

TBC

Tim Jones Brass

TBC

August

Baroque Bassoon

TBC

22-28 October

Sue-Ellen Paulson & friends

TBC
Stanley Town Hall

TBC
LifeWay Baptist Church
Devonport

TBC
St Andrews Anglican Church
Evandale

TBC
Portland Memorial Hall
St Helens

TBC
Home Hill Winery*
Ranelagh


TBC
MONA Organ Room
Berriedale

13-16 November

Jazz!

TBC
LifeWay Baptist Church
Devonport

TBC
Home Hill Winery*
Ranelagh


TBC
MONA Organ Room
Berriedale

TBC
Christ Church
Longford

TBC
Portland Memorial Hall
St Helens

* If you plan to stay and enjoy a meal please contact the venue direct:

  • Riversdale Estate 6248 5555
  • Home Hill Winery 6242 1897

** Tickets $30 (no concessions). For bookings please contact:

  • David McEwan on 6391 2002 or 0417 976 235, or
  • Val Murfett on 6397 8366

Cello & Piano Encore!

Back by popular demand following their wonderful concert last year, Jonathan Békés (cello) and Ying Ho (piano) present music by Beethoven, Beach, Tcherepnin and Chopin.

Pictured: Ying Ho and Jonathan Békés.

Program Notes

Beethoven (1770-1827)
Variations on 'Bei Männern, welche Liebe fühlen' from 'The Magic Flute', WoO 46

A 17-year-old Beethoven, who considered Mozart the greatest living composer, spent less than an hour with his idol in Vienna when he impressed Mozart with his virtuosity on the piano and an example of his own compositions. An unfortunate chain of events denied Beethoven his desire to receive lessons from Mozart, and this was the only meeting between these musical giants. Nevertheless, Beethoven remained an avid admirer and promoter of Mozart's music.

Beethoven wrote two sets of variations on two arias from Mozart’s most famous opera, The Magic Flute. Variations on ‘Bei Mannern, welche Lieben fuhle,” is his second such offering and was published in 1802.

Amy Beach (1867-1944)
Romance Op.23

Arguably the most prominent and one of the earliest American women composer, the child prodigy Amy Beach was a self-taught composer of late 19th-century romantic music. Her Romance Op 23, weaves the elements of spontaneity, originality and virtuosity in a composition that has endured in the standard repertoire for violin and piano since it premiered in 1893.

The performance had to be repeated during its premiere as the cheering audience would not accept any other encore piece! Amy Beach was accompanied on the Piano by her life-long friend and fellow child prodigy Maud Powell.

Tcherepnin (1899-1977)
Cello Sonata No.2, Op 30/1

Much like the Bach family, the surname Tchrepnin refers to six composers representing three generations of the same family of Russian composers. Among them, Alexander Tchrepnin is the most famous and prolific. He was born 1899 in Saint Petersburg and died in Paris in 1977 having lived, studied and worked in Saint Petersburg, Tbilisi Georgia, Paris and New York.

Tcherepnin is well known for his use of pentatonic scales as well as the nine-note “chromatic-perfect scale” also known as “Tchrepnin Scale”. Although today he is less known than other Russian composers of the early twentieth century, in his time Tchrepnin was regarded as a rival to Prokofiev and the “second Stravinsky”.

Chopin (1810-1849)
Cello Sonata in G minor, Op.65

The last work published during the composer’s lifetime, the cello sonata is one of the only nine works that Chopin wrote for instruments other than solo piano. The work premiered in the last public concert by Chopin on 16 February 1848.

Letters from Chopin to his family indicate that composing the cello sonata was filled with “questions, uncertainties, challenging choices and hard labour” and took over three years to complete. Nevertheless, just like all of Chopin’s compositions, the work is regarded as a masterpiece. The split with George Sand had ushered in the post-romantic period in Chopin’s work, and this composition represents the pinnacle of this period.